Interdisciplinary collaboration as a catalyst for innovation

Over Easter in 1300 Dante traveled through hell. Over Easter 2019 I took sourdough starter on Dante’s journey, punished it according to the cantos and relayed the results back to clay forms based on electron microscope pictures of my sourdough.

I wrote about how art, science and philosophy are interlinked and co-dependent and you can read Interdisciplinary collaboration as a catalyst for innovation on Academia if you are interested.

Cyclic movement is congruent to science, philosophy and art.

Scientific breakthroughs are based on facts, precisely measured and analysed. Major philosophical theories are born from concepts and thought experiments. I suspect art lies somewhere in between.

I bake bread weekly and observed that the rising and falling of the sourdough starter echoed my creative thought process; a constant, respiratory movement that was eternal as long as it was fed with new ideas. This repetitive cycling happens in philosophy too. In The Divine Comedy, Dante travels down through Hell and upwards to Heaven passing through Purgatory on the way. This spiralling, rising and falling storyline is analogous to both the baking of bread and my personal design process. This cyclic movement was the starting point for investigation into the topic.

Electron microscope pictures of sourdough.

 

UWE let me have a go on an electron microscope with dough

The Tiny Art Gallery Manual

a book to help you run your own small gallery kindle and in print

a book to help you run your own small gallery kindle and in print

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